Yellowball.
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James Anderson

Yellowball have been instrumental in improving our visibility on search engines and we are extremely happy with the relationship.

FAISAL LALJEE VP MARKETING

Campaign Brief

As the UK’s largest beauty on demand service, Yellowball were brought on to fix major technical SEO issues and deliver a service that would enable blow to become the Uber of beauty services.

To establish itself as the go-to mobile beauty service provider across the UK, blow LTD needed a website that had a substantial and established search presence in the online beauty industry. Following our initial keyword research and onsite optimisation, we identified where blow LTD could stand out from its competitors and attract more organic search traffic to its website.

Key Successes

Working closely with blow LTD to understand what was important to them as a business, we set about establishing them as the undisputed mobile beauty booking service in search. Thanks to our detailed keyword research, technical SEO implementation and targeted content creation, our SEO campaign had a flying start. Less than half a year into our SEO campaign, blow LTD’s average keyword position had increased from 63 to 18, the equivalent of jumping up five pages on SERPs, with blow LTD displaying in the top spots on the first page of Google for multiple target keywords.

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Identify the right featured snippets

We briefly discussed this in our previous article but wanted to dive into a little more detail here. Having criteria upon which to base your targeting decisions will provide structure and guidelines to your operational plans. Featured snippets can be very enticing, so these criteria should help you remain focussed on your SEO goals:

Does a featured snippet already appear?

This may seem like an obvious one, but when you type in the query, does a featured snippet appear? If yes, you can be confident that Google considers it to be the correct type of search for a featured snippet. Bear in mind though that more and more queries are being returned with a featured snippet. If one doesn’t appear right now, that doesn’t mean that it won’t in the future. It may also mean that Google doesn’t consider the current answers provided by websites to be sufficient. It’s a slightly riskier tactic to assign resources to a featured snippet that doesn’t already exist, so it’s worth approaching it with caution. Would this be part of your normal content strategy? Do you stand a good chance of ranking on page one? Regardless of the potential for a featured snippet, would this search term (and subsequent content) deliver valuable traffic to your site?

How do you find these featured snippets? Through a combination of more traditional research as well as utilising tools such as SEMrush or Ahrefs. For example, SEMrush allow you to find featured snippets that are currently occupied by your competitors, which is pretty handy! Both of these platforms do a good job of explaining how to find featured snippets (alongside Moz) so jump over to their websites for more info on sniffing out opportunities.

Buyer Personas

A key part of a content strategy is establishing your buyer personas and their corresponding buying funnel. Without this you run the risk of creating content for the sake of it. Targeting snippets that have low search volumes or result in virtually no additional traffic may help you gain brownie points with your management or client for a short period. But ultimately traffic and conversions are the end game.

We therefore need to ensure that any search term for which we create and optimise our content is relevant to your buyer personas and their buying funnel. There is a really good study published by A.J Ghergich for SEMrush that explores questions, prepositions and comparisons. It also mentioned pricing being an end of funnel type query that can be targeted, so we highly recommend you having a read of it as well.

This mistaken idea of denouncing pleasure and praising pain was born and I will give you a complete.

DAVID GROOMBRIDGE

Does a featured snippet already appear?

This may seem like an obvious one, but when you type in the query, does a featured snippet appear? If yes, you can be confident that Google considers it to be the correct type of search for a featured snippet. Bear in mind though that more and more queries are being returned with a featured snippet:

  • If one doesn’t appear right now, that doesn’t mean that it won’t in the future. It may also mean that Google doesn’t consider the current answers provided by
  • Websites to be sufficient. It’s a slightly riskier tactic to assign resources to a featured snippet that doesn’t already exist, so it’s worth approaching it with caution. Would this be part of your normal content strategy?
  • Do you stand a good chance of ranking on page one? Regardless of the potential
  • For a featured snippet, would this search term (and subsequent content) deliver valuable traffic to your site?

How to target featured snippets

Most importantly, you should look to provide a high quality, unique, clear and concise answer to the search query. Utilise the most appropriate structure, whether that be a paragraph, list, table or video and include schema markup for clarity.

Focus on providing the highest amount of value for the search query within 40 to 50 words. After all, this is what search engines are trying to provide to their searchers within a featured snippet. As with all things SEO, pay particular attention to the intent behind the search, as Google (through Rankbrain) will be providing the answer that best aligns with this intent.

  1. If one doesn’t appear right now, that doesn’t mean that it won’t in the future. It may also mean that Google doesn’t consider the current answers provided by
  2. Websites to be sufficient. It’s a slightly riskier tactic to assign resources to a featured snippet that doesn’t already exist, so it’s worth approaching it with caution. Would this be part of your normal content strategy?
  3. Do you stand a good chance of ranking on page one? Regardless of the potential
  4. For a featured snippet, would this search term (and subsequent content) deliver valuable traffic to your site?

How to target featured snippets

Most importantly, you should look to provide a high quality, unique, clear and concise answer to the search query. Utilise the most appropriate structure, whether that be a paragraph, list, table or video and include schema markup for clarity.

H4 Assess search intent

A critical part of SEO, you need to ensure that the searcher intent has been established for your target search term. In turn, you can analyse the current results to gain a better understanding of what search engines deem to be the intent and therefore tailor your answer accordingly.

You’ve done the hard work of getting traffic to the site. If you’ve followed our steps, this traffic should be relevant to your business or organisation, i.e fit somewhere in your sales funnel. Loop in your web designers, UX team or CRO specialists. Brief them on the type of traffic that is being generated, where they are landing and figure out where you want them to go next.

Need we say any more? Capitalise on this new source of inquisitive traffic. There’s a strong argument to say that if they’ve clicked through to your site having already been displayed more content than a normal SERP result, they’re likely to be more interested!
Good luck. See you on the battlefield.

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